What did I receive from my ancestors?

To keep everything in perspective, the following chart shows the chance of inheriting at least one or perhaps more chromosomes from a given ancestor. Although it is possible for chromosomes to be passed on in fractions (called “cross-over”), that does not appreciably affect the odds shown here. However, marriages between ancestors who are cousins will increase somewhat the odds of inheritance and will also reduce the number of ancestors (but that is not known to be the case in the lineage shown below).

The odds shown disregard the sex of the subject (Self) person . . .

In the case of a man (“YX” sex chromosomes), the “Y” chromosome is always inherited through the direct male lineage. So in the lineage shown below, it is 100% certain that Kurt, Franz and Mark inherited their “Y” chromosomes from Ioannes Langmann, but highly unlikely that they inherited any other chromosome from Ioannes. On the other hand, they each have about a 50-50 chance of having inherited at least one other chromosome from Karl Langmann, their fourth-great grandfather.

In the case of a woman (“XX” sex chromosomes), neither “X” chromosome is inherited from the paternal grandfather, but one is inherited from the paternal grandmother, another from the mother.

Bear in mind that one’s 46 chromosomes all came from some set of ancestors in any given generation.

Generations Back   Lineage Number of Ancestors Odds of Inheriting One or More Chromosomes
0 Self Kurt, Franz & Mark Langmann, b. 1954, 1958 & 1963 -- --
1 Parent Rudy Langmann, b. 1930 2 1.0000000, certain
2 Grandparent Richard Robert Langmann, b. 1904 4 0.9999999, virtually certain
3 Great Grandparent Harald Rudolf Langmann, b. 1881 8 0.9986621, almost certain
4 2G Grandparent Rudolf Wilhelm Georg Bernhard Langmann, b. 1840 16 0.9536355, about 21 out of 22
5 3G Grandparent Johann Friedrich Christoph Langmann, b. 1802 32 0.7733585, about 3 out of 4
6 4G Grandparent Karl Ludwig Caspar Langmann, b. 1767 64 0.5181970, about even
7 5G Grandparent Andreas Langmann, b. 1719 128 0.3038654, about 1 out of 3
8 6G Grandparent Andreas Langmann, b. 1681 256 0.1650581, about 1 out of 6
9 7G Grandparent Bartholomaus Langmann, b. 1648 512 0.0860868, about 1 out of 12
10 8G Grandparent Bartholomaus Langmann, b. 1604 1024 0.0439698, about 1 out of 23
11 9G Grandparent Joachim Langmann, b. 1560 2048 0.0222213, about 1 out of 45
12 10G Grandparent Nicolaus Langmann, b.abt.1530 4096 0.0111117, about 1 out of 90
13 11G Grandparent Heinrich Langmann, b.abt.1485 8192 infinitesimal
14 12G Grandparent Joachim Langmann, b.abt. 1450 16384 --
15 13G Grandparent Nicolaus Langmann, b.abt. 1410 32768 --
16 14G Grandparent Peter Langmann, b.abt. 1360 65536 --
17 15G Grandparent Heinrich Nicolaus Langmann, b. 1323 131072 --
18 16G Grandparent Hans Langmann, b.abt. 1280 262144 --
19 17G Grandparent Conrad Langmann, b.abt. 1240 524288 --
25-26 (?) 23G Grandparent Ioannes Langmann, b.abt. 980 33554432 --

How y-DNA is passed from generation to generation:How  y-DNA is passed from generation to generation:

The table above can easily be modified by substituting another known all-male lineage from 0 to X generations.